North American Beaver

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North American Beaver

North American BeaverOriginal.jpg

North American BeaverOldDesign.jpg

Character Data
Also known as: American Beaver
Japanese Name: アメリカビーバー
Romanised Name: Amerika Bībā
First Featured in: Kemono Friends (2015 Game)
Animal Data
Scientific Name: Castor canadensis
Distribution: North America, Scandinavia, Argentina
Diet: Herbivore
Average Lifespan in the Wild: 24 Years
Read More: North American beaver
Conservation Status: Status iucn3.1 LC.svg.png
North American Beaver Anime Season 2 Festival Pavilion Nexon Game

North American Beaver is a beaver Friend who appeared in both the Kemono Friends anime and the original mobile game.

Appearance

North American Beaver's current design has light brown hair with side bangs reaching her shoulder which are white at their top, she also has a hair clip attached to one of them. Her outfit composed of a brown sleeveless jacket which is open to her torso and her belly. Complementing her neck, she wear a fur collar. She has a light beige shorts that also surrounds the back of her tail. She patterned almost full-length gloves are covering her arms, she's also wearing a compression short that have yellow and a red lines on it. Lastly, she wears black boots with black ribbons decorating them.

In Real Life

North American Beaver (Amerika Bībā)

The North American beaver (Castor canadensis) is one of two extant beaver species. It inhabits areas near lakes, ponds, and streams with access to suitable food and building resources. Beavers are known for their ability to modify an environment through the construction of dams, which often cause flooding of the surrounding areas.

To obtain food and building materials, beavers are well known for their ability to topple large trees using nothing but their specially adapted incisor teeth and powerful lower jaw muscles. Beaver teeth never stop growing, so they do not become too worn despite years of chewing hardwoods. The beaver’s most distinctive feature is their large flat tail, which serves as a rudder when swimming, a prop when sitting or standing upright, and a storehouse of fat for the winter. They have excellent senses of hearing and smell, and rely on these senses more than their less developed sense of eyesight.

Beavers live in lodges. The lodge, itself, is an oven-shaped house of sticks, grass, and moss, woven together and plastered with mud. Over the years, repair and elaboration leads to an increase in hut size. To construct lodges and dams, Beavers will take down trees. Usually they are small trees, but sometimes, especially if there aren't smaller trees around, they will take large ones. To do this, the Beaver will use its large front teeth to bite chips off the trunk, while working its way around. Beavers' lips are behind the front teeth, so they can close their mouth while they work on a tree. Beavers build dams to slow down the flow of water in streams and rivers and then build stable lodges for shelter. The dams are engineered according to the speed of the water; in slow water the dam is built straight, but in fast water the dam is built with a curve in it. This provides stability so that the dam will not be washed away.

Beavers are pure vegetarians, subsisting solely on woody vegetations such as bark and cambium (the softer growing tissue under the bark of trees). Their favorites include willow, maple, poplar, beech, birch, alder, and aspen trees. They also eat water vegetation, as well as buds, and roots. Cellulose, which usually can not be digested by mammals, is a major component of their diet.

Beavers are typically social and peaceful animals, with a strong family structure. However, to protect their limited food supply, a beaver will not allow unrelated beavers to inhabit its pond. To mark their territories they surround their ponds with scent mounds. Scent mounds are piles of mud with the adult’s castor oil mixed in. They act as warnings to any beaver that may be passing through the area. Adult beavers will defend their territory by attacking any beaver outside its family who enters it. However, other than territorial disputes or self-defense, they appear to have a strong inhibition towards biting and are not known to attack humans. Beavers are primarily nocturnal. They are only occasionally seen during the day, usually around dusk. Beavers travel good distances from their homes to find food. If they find a good source, they build canals to the food source as a way to float the food back to their lodges.

Overall there are no major threats to the species throughout its range.

Trivia

Beaver dam
  • The beaver was given official status as an emblem of Canada when “An Act to provide for the recognition of the Beaver (Castor canadensis) as a symbol of the sovereignty of Canada” received royal assent on March 24, 1975. Further reading here Official symbols of Canada. Government of Canada.
  • The longest beaver dam found to date (October 2 2007) is located in Northern Alberta. The dam has a length of about 850 meters (2790 ft). It has at least existed at this spot for over 25 years. Further reading on : "EcoInformatics.
  • Beavers are extremely important to other wildlife. Their dams create habitat for many species of plants and animals.

References

1. "Castor canadensis" By Rebecca Anderson. Animal Diversity Web.

2. "Beaver Biology". Beaver Solutions.

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