Difference between revisions of "Springbok"

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{{2DesignFriendBuilder
 
|introduction=The '''Springbok''' is a type of mammal [[Friend]] that debuted in the original [[Kemono Friends (2015 Mobile Game)|Kemono Friends mobile game]]. She has since been redesigned and was added to [[Kemono Friends Pavilion]] in 2020.
 
|introduction=The '''Springbok''' is a type of mammal [[Friend]] that debuted in the original [[Kemono Friends (2015 Mobile Game)|Kemono Friends mobile game]]. She has since been redesigned and was added to [[Kemono Friends Pavilion]] in 2020.
|appearance=In her current design, Springbok has deep peachy soil colored hair, fastened with a pink bind in a medium length ponytail. Her bangs are white and slope down to a point in the center. At the edges, her bangs also feature white chin-length bunches of hair covering both human ears and thinner dark brown bunches at the inner edges. Atop her head are two long, pointed ears with narrow openings featuring dark brown inner ear markings. Between these ears, she has two pointy black horns which are ribbed and inwardly curved. Her eyes are brown.
+
|appearance====Current Design Appearance===
 +
In her current design, Springbok has deep peachy soil colored hair, fastened with a pink bind in a medium length ponytail. Her bangs are white and slope down to a point in the center. At the edges, her bangs also feature white chin-length bunches of hair covering both human ears and thinner dark brown bunches at the inner edges. Atop her head are two long, pointed ears with narrow openings featuring dark brown inner ear markings. Between these ears, she has two pointy black horns which are ribbed and inwardly curved. Her eyes are brown.
  
 
She wears a long-sleeved, zipped up tracksuit jacket with a tall collar. Like her hair, the jacket is a deep peachy soil color with a white front and thick, dark brown lines falling from the underarms. Slightly covered by the jacket, she wears a brown pleated skirt with a dark brown stripe at the edge. Under the skirt, she wears a pair of tights which are a deep peach color on the outer legs and a white color at the inner legs. She also wears a pair of black gloves.
 
She wears a long-sleeved, zipped up tracksuit jacket with a tall collar. Like her hair, the jacket is a deep peachy soil color with a white front and thick, dark brown lines falling from the underarms. Slightly covered by the jacket, she wears a brown pleated skirt with a dark brown stripe at the edge. Under the skirt, she wears a pair of tights which are a deep peach color on the outer legs and a white color at the inner legs. She also wears a pair of black gloves.
  
For footwear, Springbok wears a pair of white ballerina flats with a black front end. Her tail is thin, medium in size, and is a deep peach color at the base, descending to a dark brown at the end. Emerging from under her skirt is a patch of long white dorsal hairs. In her right hand, she holds a long pink and white striped staff with a fuzzy pink end from which a set of springbok horns emerges.
+
For footwear, Springbok wears a pair of white ballerina flats with a black front end. Her tail is thin, medium in size, and is a deep peach color at the base, descending to a dark brown at the end. Emerging from under her skirt is a patch of long white dorsal hairs. In her right hand, she holds a long pink and white striped staff with a fuzzy pink end from which a set of springbok horns emerges. Springbok is depicted performing a pronking jump.
  
Springbok is depicted performing a pronking jump.
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===Original Design Appearance===
 +
In her original design, Springbok has long, waist-length, light brown hair which is white colored on the underside. Her bangs include two adjacent crescent bunches of white hair and a light brown middle bunch that slopes down to a point. Atop her head, she has two white antelope ears with brown tips and a pair of curved horns. She has gray-blue eyes.
 +
 
 +
She wears a brown collared shirt with a patch of white from the chest down and features a gold and white bolo tie. Over the shirt, she wears a Juliet sleeved brown blazer with white underarms and white cuffs. Below the shirt, she wears a dark cerulean pleated skirt with a white stripe at the edge. She wears light brown tights which are white on the inward sides.
 +
 
 +
Springbok sports a pair of light brown penny loafers. Her tail is thin, short, and is black at the end. She also holds a blue handled staff with a ribbed, black horn at each end.
 
|reallife=[[File:Antidorcas marsupialis, male (Etosha, 2012).jpg|thumb|upright=1.0|left|A male springbok in Etosha National Park in Namibia.]]
 
|reallife=[[File:Antidorcas marsupialis, male (Etosha, 2012).jpg|thumb|upright=1.0|left|A male springbok in Etosha National Park in Namibia.]]
  
The Springbok (''Antidorcas marsupialis'') is a species of antelope native to southwestern Africa, occupying much of Namibia, Botswana, South Africa and southwestern Angola.<ref> IUCN SSC Antelope Specialist Group. 2016. Antidorcas marsupialis (errata version published in 2017). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T1676A115056763. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-3.RLTS.T1676A50181753.en. Accessed on 11th, August 2020.</ref> There are three recognized subspecies, the Angolan Springbok (''A. m. angolensis''), Kalahari Springbok (''A. m. hofmeyri''), and the Southern Springbok (''A. m. marsupialis''). The springbok was first described by German zoologist E. A. W. von Zimmermann in 1780, who gave the species it's scientific name.<ref>[https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=625085#null ITIS Standard Report Page: Antidorcas marsupialis], Integrated Taxonomic Information System, Accessed on 4th, October 2020.</ref> The ''marsupialis'' portion of the name refers to a dorsal skin fold from which long white hairs protrude when a Springbok preforms its signature pronking jump.
+
The Springbok (''Antidorcas marsupialis'') is a species of antelope native to southwestern Africa, occupying much of Namibia, Botswana, South Africa and southwestern Angola.<ref name="IUCN ASG">IUCN SSC Antelope Specialist Group. 2016. Antidorcas marsupialis (errata version published in 2017). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T1676A115056763. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-3.RLTS.T1676A50181753.en. Accessed on 11th, August 2020.</ref>
 +
 
 +
There are three recognized subspecies, the Angolan Springbok (''A. m. angolensis''), Kalahari Springbok (''A. m. hofmeyri''), and the Southern Springbok (''A. m. marsupialis''). The springbok was first described by German zoologist E. A. W. von Zimmermann in 1780, who gave the species it's scientific name.<ref>[https://www.itis.gov/servlet/SingleRpt/SingleRpt?search_topic=TSN&search_value=625085#null ITIS Standard Report Page: Antidorcas marsupialis], Integrated Taxonomic Information System, Accessed on 4th, October 2020.</ref> The ''marsupialis'' portion of the name refers to a dorsal skin fold from which long white hairs protrude when a Springbok preforms its signature pronking jump. Of the three subspecies, ''A. m. angolensis'' is found in northwestern Namibia and southwestern Angola, ''A. m. hofmeyri'' is the largest in size and is found in most of Namibia, Botswana and northern South Africa, and ''A. m. marsupialis'' is the smallest in size and is found in most of southern South Africa.<ref name="Furstenburg D">Furstenburg, D. 2016. Springbok Antidorcas marsupialis Management. In: Eds. Pamela Oberem, The New Game Rancher. BRIZA Publisher, Pretoria. p 226-234. ISBN 978-1-920217-62-4, Accessed on 16th, August, 2020.</ref> Both male and female Springbok have dark, inward pointing horns with many ribs, but female horns are more slender and small in size.<ref name="Richard E" />
  
Of the three subspecies, ''A. m. angolensis'' is found in northwestern Namibia and southwestern Angola, ''A. m. hofmeyri'' is the largest in size and is found in most of Namibia, Botswana and northern South Africa, and ''A. m. marsupialis'' is the smallest in size and is found in most of southern South Africa.<ref>Furstenburg, D. 2016. Springbok Antidorcas marsupialis Management. In: Eds. Pamela Oberem, The New Game Rancher. BRIZA Publisher, Pretoria. p 226-234. ISBN 978-1-920217-62-4, Accessed on 16th, August, 2020.</ref>
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The Springbok inhabits arid regions of southwestern Africa and is commonly found in open grasslands. Springbok generally avoid movement restricting areas such as mountains and forests.<ref name="James W">James W. Cain, III, Paul R. Krausman, Heather L. Germaine, Antidorcas marsupialis, Mammalian Species, Issue 753, 15 December 2004, Pages 1–7, https://doi.org/10.1644/753</ref> Springbok browse and graze seasonally, consuming grasses such as succulent grass in the warmer rainy season and shrubs in the dry season. They drink water opportunistically but can survive off of the water in the vegetation they consume if it contains at least 10 percent water content.<ref name="Richard E"> Estes, Richard. “Springbok.” Britannica.com, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 13 Feb. 2020, www.britannica.com/animal/springbok-mammal, Accessed on 18th, October 2020</ref>
  
The Springbok is native to arid regions of southern Africa and is commonly found in open grasslands. Springbok generally avoid movement restricting areas such as mountains and forests..<ref name="James W">James W. Cain, III, Paul R. Krausman, Heather L. Germaine, Antidorcas marsupialis, Mammalian Species, Issue 753, 15 December 2004, Pages 1–7, https://doi.org/10.1644/753</ref> Springbok browse and graze seasonally, consuming grasses such as succulent grass in the warmer rainy season and shrubs in the dry season. They drink water opportunistically but can survive off of the water in the vegetation they consume if it contains at least 10 percent water content.<ref> Estes, Richard. “Springbok.” Britannica.com, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 13 Feb. 2020, www.britannica.com/animal/springbok-mammal, Accessed on 18th, October 2020</ref>
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Springbok are most active in the early morning and early evening hours of the day. Feeding most often occurs during these times. On hot days Springbok may forage at night and on cool days they may also forage during the middle of the day.<ref name="James W" /> At the end of the rainy season, when the Springbok are faring the best, they will enter their annual rut.<ref name="Richard E" /> During the rut, males will attempt to herd females that enter their territory and will clash with neighboring males as well as males that invade their territory.<ref name="James W" /> Fights will consist of “front-pressing, lateral twisting, and levering”.
  
Springbok are most active in the early morning and early evening hours of the day. Feeding most often occurs during these times. On hot days Springbok may forage at night and on cool days they may also forage during the middle of the day.<ref name="James W" />
+
Springbok at their peak population numbers ranged close to a billion animals, the most of any antelope.<ref name="Furstenburg D" /> They still inhabit most of their historical range, but the Angolan population is now much smaller. The species was exterminated in much of its South African range during the late 1800s as hunting and outbreaks of the rinderpest cattle disease greatly reduced their numbers.<ref name="IUCN ASG" />
  
 
[[File:Springbok pronk.jpg|thumb|upright=0.5|right|A young pronking Springbok.]]
 
[[File:Springbok pronk.jpg|thumb|upright=0.5|right|A young pronking Springbok.]]
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[[Category:Needs Appearance]] [[Category:Needs RL Info]] [[Category:Real Animal Friends]] [[Category:Mammal Friends]] [[Category:Bovid Friends]] [[Category:Nexon Game Debuts]] [[Category:Redesigned Friends]]
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[[Category:Needs RL Info]] [[Category:Real Animal Friends]] [[Category:Mammal Friends]] [[Category:Bovid Friends]] [[Category:Nexon Game Debuts]] [[Category:Redesigned Friends]]

Latest revision as of 21:02, 29 November 2020

Springbok

SpringbokOriginal.jpg

SpringbokOldDesign.jpg

Character Data
Japanese Name: スプリングボック
Romanised Name: Supuringubokku
First Featured in: Kemono Friends (2015 Game)
Animal Data
Scientific Name: Antidorcas marsupialis
Distribution: South Africa
Diet: Herbivore
Average Lifespan in the Wild: 7-9 years
Read More: Springbok
Conservation Status: Status iucn3.1 LC.svg.png
Springbok Pavilion Nexon Game

The Springbok is a type of mammal Friend that debuted in the original Kemono Friends mobile game. She has since been redesigned and was added to Kemono Friends Pavilion in 2020.

Appearance

Current Design Appearance

In her current design, Springbok has deep peachy soil colored hair, fastened with a pink bind in a medium length ponytail. Her bangs are white and slope down to a point in the center. At the edges, her bangs also feature white chin-length bunches of hair covering both human ears and thinner dark brown bunches at the inner edges. Atop her head are two long, pointed ears with narrow openings featuring dark brown inner ear markings. Between these ears, she has two pointy black horns which are ribbed and inwardly curved. Her eyes are brown.

She wears a long-sleeved, zipped up tracksuit jacket with a tall collar. Like her hair, the jacket is a deep peachy soil color with a white front and thick, dark brown lines falling from the underarms. Slightly covered by the jacket, she wears a brown pleated skirt with a dark brown stripe at the edge. Under the skirt, she wears a pair of tights which are a deep peach color on the outer legs and a white color at the inner legs. She also wears a pair of black gloves.

For footwear, Springbok wears a pair of white ballerina flats with a black front end. Her tail is thin, medium in size, and is a deep peach color at the base, descending to a dark brown at the end. Emerging from under her skirt is a patch of long white dorsal hairs. In her right hand, she holds a long pink and white striped staff with a fuzzy pink end from which a set of springbok horns emerges. Springbok is depicted performing a pronking jump.

Original Design Appearance

In her original design, Springbok has long, waist-length, light brown hair which is white colored on the underside. Her bangs include two adjacent crescent bunches of white hair and a light brown middle bunch that slopes down to a point. Atop her head, she has two white antelope ears with brown tips and a pair of curved horns. She has gray-blue eyes.

She wears a brown collared shirt with a patch of white from the chest down and features a gold and white bolo tie. Over the shirt, she wears a Juliet sleeved brown blazer with white underarms and white cuffs. Below the shirt, she wears a dark cerulean pleated skirt with a white stripe at the edge. She wears light brown tights which are white on the inward sides.

Springbok sports a pair of light brown penny loafers. Her tail is thin, short, and is black at the end. She also holds a blue handled staff with a ribbed, black horn at each end.

In Real Life

A male springbok in Etosha National Park in Namibia.

The Springbok (Antidorcas marsupialis) is a species of antelope native to southwestern Africa, occupying much of Namibia, Botswana, South Africa and southwestern Angola.[1]

There are three recognized subspecies, the Angolan Springbok (A. m. angolensis), Kalahari Springbok (A. m. hofmeyri), and the Southern Springbok (A. m. marsupialis). The springbok was first described by German zoologist E. A. W. von Zimmermann in 1780, who gave the species it's scientific name.[2] The marsupialis portion of the name refers to a dorsal skin fold from which long white hairs protrude when a Springbok preforms its signature pronking jump. Of the three subspecies, A. m. angolensis is found in northwestern Namibia and southwestern Angola, A. m. hofmeyri is the largest in size and is found in most of Namibia, Botswana and northern South Africa, and A. m. marsupialis is the smallest in size and is found in most of southern South Africa.[3] Both male and female Springbok have dark, inward pointing horns with many ribs, but female horns are more slender and small in size.[4]

The Springbok inhabits arid regions of southwestern Africa and is commonly found in open grasslands. Springbok generally avoid movement restricting areas such as mountains and forests.[5] Springbok browse and graze seasonally, consuming grasses such as succulent grass in the warmer rainy season and shrubs in the dry season. They drink water opportunistically but can survive off of the water in the vegetation they consume if it contains at least 10 percent water content.[4]

Springbok are most active in the early morning and early evening hours of the day. Feeding most often occurs during these times. On hot days Springbok may forage at night and on cool days they may also forage during the middle of the day.[5] At the end of the rainy season, when the Springbok are faring the best, they will enter their annual rut.[4] During the rut, males will attempt to herd females that enter their territory and will clash with neighboring males as well as males that invade their territory.[5] Fights will consist of “front-pressing, lateral twisting, and levering”.

Springbok at their peak population numbers ranged close to a billion animals, the most of any antelope.[3] They still inhabit most of their historical range, but the Angolan population is now much smaller. The species was exterminated in much of its South African range during the late 1800s as hunting and outbreaks of the rinderpest cattle disease greatly reduced their numbers.[1]

A young pronking Springbok.

References

  1. 1.0 1.1 IUCN SSC Antelope Specialist Group. 2016. Antidorcas marsupialis (errata version published in 2017). The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2016: e.T1676A115056763. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2016-3.RLTS.T1676A50181753.en. Accessed on 11th, August 2020.
  2. ITIS Standard Report Page: Antidorcas marsupialis, Integrated Taxonomic Information System, Accessed on 4th, October 2020.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Furstenburg, D. 2016. Springbok Antidorcas marsupialis Management. In: Eds. Pamela Oberem, The New Game Rancher. BRIZA Publisher, Pretoria. p 226-234. ISBN 978-1-920217-62-4, Accessed on 16th, August, 2020.
  4. 4.0 4.1 4.2 Estes, Richard. “Springbok.” Britannica.com, Encyclopædia Britannica, Inc., 13 Feb. 2020, www.britannica.com/animal/springbok-mammal, Accessed on 18th, October 2020
  5. 5.0 5.1 5.2 James W. Cain, III, Paul R. Krausman, Heather L. Germaine, Antidorcas marsupialis, Mammalian Species, Issue 753, 15 December 2004, Pages 1–7, https://doi.org/10.1644/753
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